Someone I Love is Poorly: Activity for Primary-Age Children with a Sick Relative

This resource is designed to help adults engage younger children in supportive conversations about a loved one’s illness. We invite children to gently open up about worries they may have, give them confidence to ask questions and demonstrate that there are people in their lives who are prepared to help them find out the answers.

Coping with a Parent’s Alcoholism: Worksheet for Primary-Age Children

This resource is designed to help adults engage younger children in supportive conversations about a parent’s alcoholism. We invite children to gently open up about worries they may have, give them confidence to ask questions and demonstrate that there are people in their lives who are prepared to help answer those questions. This resources also features a question and answer section written for adults to use, with guideline responses suggested by NACOA (National Association for the Children of Alcoholics).

Books About Autism for Parents, School Staff, Children and Young People

This list consists predominantly of books that are written for parents, carers and school staff by leading experts in the field of autism. The first section is followed by some books that are directed at young people with autism which can be either read by themselves or together with a parent, carer, or at school.

Supporting Siblings When Their Brother or Sister Has an Eating Disorder

Join Dr Kathy Weston and consultant clinical psychologist, Dr Sophie Nesbitt, for a discussion of the best ways to support the siblings of young people with eating disorders. The family-based nature of most eating disorder treatment approaches means that siblings are likely to be highly impacted when their brother or sister has an eating disorder. Dr Nesbitt shares advice on how to approach conversations with siblings, how to support them through worries and wobbles and how to consider responding to tricky questions.

The Perils of Perfectionism: How Can Schools and Families Respond

Research shows that perfectionistic characteristics are on the rise among young people, feeding into a range of mental health and wellbeing difficulties, and leading to reduced motivation and performance in the longer term. The good news is that schools and families can make a difference; by supporting young people to develop “perfectionism literacy” and striving to avoid the creation of “perfectionistic environments” at home and in school. NACE CEO, Rob Lightfoot, will share an overview of current research in the field and practical strategies to help schools and families respond.

Teen Party Planning and Problem Parties: A Lawyer’s Perspective

In this webinar, Dr Weston and experienced criminal defence lawyer, Harriett Mather, (herself a mum of three teens) discuss teen parties.
Post-pandemic, parties are understandably back in fashion, but it is essential that parents understand how to plan for them effectively and safely. Harriett understands all too well what can go wrong at parties and shares her top tips, so that teens and parents can enjoy festivities without fear of regret, harm or… liability!

Tips for Helping Teens Get into Good Sleep Habits

Maintaining a good sleep routine can be challenging during adolescence. But, as parents, we have more power than you might realise to help our teens get the sleep that they need. These tips come straight from the experts.

30 Calming Drawing Ideas

Many people, young and old, find drawing, painting or being creative to be calming and soothing activities. We’ve teamed up with mindful drawing teacher, Fiona Meakin, to get her top drawing ideas for moments where you or your children need some calm (or simply when it’s a rainy day).

Questions to Ask Older Teens Ahead of Exams

Preparation for important exams and assessments starts months before the big day itself. We’ve put together a list of helpful conversation prompts to use with older teens at various stages of their revision process, from 3-6 months before their exam right up to the day after.

Five Fingers of Support: My Helping Hand

It’s important for children to identify people in their support network who they feel happy asking for help, so that they know who to turn to if they are feeling down, need cheering up or are going through a crisis. This simple activity for young children nudges them to choose five allies who are always there to support them.